Bash & Pop (featuring Tommy Stinson of The Replacements)

Las Vegas Weekly and Neon Reverb present ...

Bash & Pop (featuring Tommy Stinson of The Replacements)

The Soft White Sixties, Black Camaro, Mercy Music, SadGirl (outside stage), The Shacks, Death Valley Girls (outside stage), Death Hymn Number 9 (outside stage)

Fri, March 10, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm (event ends at 1:45 am)

Las Vegas, NV

$15.00

This event is 21 and over

Bash & Pop featuring Tommy Stinson of The Replacements - (Set time: 10:15 PM)
Bash & Pop featuring Tommy Stinson of The Replacements
When The Replacements ended their 33-show reunion tour in June 2015, founding bassist Tommy Stinson walked away with his head held high. Armed with a pocketful of new songs and a clean slate, he holed up in his home studio in Hudson, NY and played solo tour dates with a group of A+ players/friends backing him, including Luther Dickinson, Frank Ferrer, Cat Popper, Steve Selvidge, and Joe "The Kid" Sirois. They had more fun than humans should be allowed to have, and over the next year and a half they pieced together a brand new record. A BAND record.

Never one to hog the spotlight, the only logical thing to do at this point was to reanimate 'Bash & Pop', the band he started immediately following The Replacements first split in 1991. Fat Possum Records quickly signed the band and will be releasing its unknowingly-long-awaited sophomore album in early 2017.

To commemorate the resurrection of Bash & Pop, Rhino is reissuing the band's 1993 seminal debut album 'Friday Night Is Killing Me' on LP for the first time in January 2017 - exact date coming soon.

Fans can now pre-order the reissue, as well as the forthcoming new album via a Pledge Music campaign. They also have the chance to procure one-of-a-kind memorabilia items (plaid suits, bass guitars, etc), as well as cool opportunities with Tommy and the band (he'll officiate your wedding, the band will come play a concert in your basement, etc) and they can even be in the audience at Bash & Pop's first show since the late 1900's at the legendary 7th St Entry in Tommy's hometown of Minneapolis.
The Soft White Sixties - (Set time: 12:45 AM)
The Soft White Sixties
Five years together, and the members of The Soft White Sixties have rarely sat still. They've lived much of their life in a 15-passenger van, traversing the country, whipping up new riffs, new rhythms, new lyrics and then, almost immediately, breaking them out onstage. For these hard-working musicians, it was simply a way of life.

But the band needed to step back. "You don't always need to be out there selling the song live," lead singer and principal lyricist Octavio Genera says now. The Bay Area band, as he sees it, needed to exhale. The four musicians, who'd grown beyond close with one another since forming in 2010, owed it to themselves to give the new songs they were concocting their proper due.

"It was about giving these songs the attention they deserve," Genera says of the band's decision to hunker down in a one-bedroom house in East Nashville in the fall of 2014 to workshop what became their tightest, most sophisticated and melodic material to date. "Every little part of each song was really put under a microscope much more than we had in the past," says guitarist and keyboard player Aaron Eisenberg, of constructing tracks armed with bluesy struts and squirms atop menacing guitar lines. "It was an exercise in patience for a lot of us sitting with parts for awhile and letting them settle," Eisenberg adds. "You have to be able to step back and say, 'Alright, cool there's one idea. But is there a better one?'"

For the Sixties, who'd released their debut full-length album, Get Right in 2014, capturing a certain vibe and a particular mood for their next batch of recordings was essential. The band always took an 'all hands on deck' approach to writing, but in the past they chiseled their song arrangements on stage without a clear sense of direction for the final result. For the next album the musical collective — which includes bassist Ryan Noble and drummer Joey Bustos — made a conscious decision to apply a forward-thinking kind of approach, continually asking the question 'what kind of band do we want to be?' To further ensure an open-book approach to the sessions, the band enlisted producer/mixer Matt Linesch (Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeroes, Dave Mason), working with him at United Recording in Los Angeles. "Matt was almost like a fifth member, at times," Eisenberg says. "He embraced our new approach, while really stressing the importance of the music not being perfect. It's a human form of expression."

Who did they find themselves to be? "A band not afraid to embrace its murkier side", says Genera. "We wanted the songs to have a little darker tinge to them than those on our last record. Live, the tones were always a little darker, and there's a little more energy. We wanted to make sure to capture that in our recordings," Genera explains. In-studio discussions often turned to films — and more specifically the ominous tones their respective soundtracks conveyed — band members loved so much. "A lot of the movies we love have a darker, grittier side to them, grit that our music has as well," Eisenberg says, referencing the acclaimed works of filmmakers such as Quentin Tarantino, Paul Thomas Anderson and Martin Scorsese. "We wanted to write a song that would be used to introduce the villain,'" Eisenberg explains. 

For Genera, the new Soft White Sixties material marks some of his most autobiographical work yet. "It's cliché to say music is my therapy but it's so often true," the singer says with a laugh. "With creativity there isn't a manual. If the words are right and the feeling is right it doesn't matter how you sing it. What you're trying to say will come through." Many of Genera's lyrical revelations, he says, center on his belief that "all too often, relationships make one lose sight of oneself in the process. Whether it be a man needing a girl to let him go rather than string him along with hopeless expectations, or a deep dive into the concept of being in the moment and being present."

The Soft White Sixties have no doubt they're on the right path. "It's really about doing what you love, and realizing everyone is doing the same thing, just in a different way," Genera says with a smile.  Scratching their creative itch — whether in songwriting mode or performing live — is what keeps them excited for what's to come. Eisenberg says they have "a ton of other songs" they've been working on, not to mention a slew of music videos. Of course, they'll also be hitting the road to reveal their new material for much of 2016. For Genera, however, everything really boils down to a simple motto he can't shake. Says the singer with supreme confidence and conviction: "It's always about doing it better than the last time."
Black Camaro - (Set time: 11:30 PM)
Black Camaro
Members: Brian Garth: guitar, vocals, keys, percussion, bass Tom Miller: guitar, keyboard, vocals, bass James “Fuzz” Berg: percussion, guitar, vocals Jordan Robins: bass, vocals, life coaching Scott Trujillo: drums, electrodrums, vocals, smocals

Genre: thriller, drama

Hometown: Las Vegas, NV
Mercy Music - (Set time: 9:00 PM)
Mercy Music
The incomparable sound and energy of the Las Vegas three-piece Rock & Roll band Mercy Music is truly like capturing lightening in a bottle, as frontman Brendan Scholz's unmatched ability to write catchy yet soulful rock songs combined with the band's explosive live performances make them one of the clearest and most unique voices currently performing. Scholz, as lead singer/songwriter and guitar prodigy, helms the trio with a raw force only matched by the poignant, self-aware honesty in his songwriting. Beginning Mercy Music originally as a solo act, Scholz brought aboard long-time collaborator and unparalleled bassist Jarred Cooper whose enthusiasm both on and off the stage brings a quality to Mercy Music that can only be described as invigorating. Finally, balancing the band with sharp skill and precision is drummer Michael McGuinness, a talent that shines while seeming perfectly at home in the group's ferocious sound. After making a name for themselves during their incredible live shows and on tour, Mercy Music is proud to announce their new album, "When I Die I'm Taking You With Me" - a culmination of their efforts and featuring their newest, best material that is sure to surprise their fans while creating many new ones.
SadGirl (outside stage) - (Set time: 12:15 AM)
SadGirl (outside stage)
On a full moon SadGirl mysteriously surfaced out of the Pacific and staggered onto the streets of LA. Cousins Misha Lindes (guitar/vocals), Paul Caruso (drums) and Dakota Peterson (bass) don't remember much of their childhood (it was submerged at the bottom of the murky sea)

But now, the lo-fi, surf-wop trio is making waves. Proclaimed one of LA's Hardest-Working Bands by Oh My Rockness, SadGirl delivers an iconic, "DIY" package of sound and image, complete with logo and merch designs equally fashionable and punk-rock.

Like a twisted marriage between Roy Orbison and The Cramps (ordained by Link Wray) SadGirl invokes the music of a by-gone era. But don't be fooled, these aren't the tunes from Uncle Jimmy's juke box...
The Shacks - (Set time: 11:00 PM)
The Shacks
The Shacks — equal parts Max Shrager and Shannon Wise singing in her soft whispered voice — sound like they're playing alone with nobody watching. This dreamy, voyeuristic sound was born in a Queens, NY studio in 2014. And while they describe themselves as a rock band, don't expect the conventional kind.

The story goes that Max brought Shannon to the studio. Max was playing guitar on a track produced by Leon Michels — the producer and co-founder of Big Crown Records — and Michels needed a vocalist. They put Shannon in the booth to try it out. It was her first time ever recording. Then, in one take, the song "Strange Boy" had a singer who completed the vibe. The Shacks were born.

There are elements of doo-wop and early, pre-Elvis rock in their musicianship. Combine that with a deeply personal songwriting approach and it's a familiar-yet-fresh sound. Like The Five Keys met Neil Young and cut a record with Brigitte Bardot — but in English.

Here's the thing: Max and Shannon are barely in their twenties. Most of their musical influences are from before they were born. It's contradictions like this that signify something intriguing is happening with The Shacks.

Max and Shannon met while going to the same NYC high school. By that time, Max was already a musical wunderkind.

Raised in Princeton, NJ, at fourteen Max emailed Gabe Roth of Daptone Records with a rough, home-recorded demo. By seventeen, he had penned the lead single, "Sinner," on Naomi Shelton and the Gospel Queens' 2014 Cold World LP.

Shannon comes from a strong musical pedigree. Her father, a producer, ran a Manhattan recording studio, and her mother is a singer-songwriter. Artists and bands of all stripes passed through her life growing up. While her history isn't yet as extensive as Max's, she's writing it right now. Her infectious, eclectic voice and songwriting skills are testaments to her remarkable natural talent.

Their first record together, entitled Haze and forthcoming on Big Crown Records, is jointly produced by Shrager and Michels. Each song sounds both like an exploration and reflection of the relationship between Shannon and Max. You can hear a kind of invigorating creativity between them — songs written for and about each other, trying to express the inexpressible aspects of youth and love.

"We just want people to get excited about real music again," says Max. "When we record we try to capture what's happening — in our lives, things between us, something in the studio that day, just something honest. Not something pieced together and hyperreal."

In a modern culture where most music is manufactured and artificial, Max Shrager and Shannon Wise want to introduce their generation to a more honest kind of music. A kind that's written from life and made with integrity and value. And all this before either of them can rent a car.
Death Valley Girls (outside stage) - (Set time: 9:45 PM)
Death Valley Girls (outside stage)
Think of Death Valley Girls as an acid-tripping science experiment that's been buried alive, and resurrected as a sexually liberated dystopian chain-gang. A cosmic scar, if you will, on the hills of Echo Park, where the experiment began in 2013 by proto-punk Bonnie Bloomgarden and guitarist Larry Schemel — who got lost in the desert, returned to their haunted garage in Echo Park, and pieced together their vision with shopworn images of sexploitation babes, a blood-soaked Iggy Pop, and Bloomgarden's series of phantasms, the result of spending a year in a mental institution, where she planned her neon-glowing odyssey by listening to Black Sabbath and UFO, reading about alien conspiracy theories, and deriving her band's moral compass from a line she saw in a movie:

"Everybody's gotta be in a gang," from campy sexploitation romp Switchblade Sisters (1975).
Death Hymn Number 9 (outside stage) - (Set time: 8:00 PM)
Death Hymn Number 9 (outside stage)
Formed out of the murky Louisiana Swamp, these four denizens of somnambulance and limited brain power were a former backing band to Motown's greats, until abandoned at a routine gas stop in Baton Rouge in August 1965. In an act of brazen post-mortem activity, the band soldiered on, focusing their collective rage and wild abandonment issues into a thrashy, gross, fast, groovy, loud, hurt-feeling-fest of garage and punk rock bravado. After emerging from those garbage laden swamps, the band relocated to Los Angeles in late 2009 to annoy and harass the lazy bourgeois bar going public and teenage backyard house show attendee. Who knows what posthumous ridiculousness will ensue
Venue Information:
Bunkhouse
124 South 11th Street
Las Vegas, NV, 89101